Tips & Articles

21
June
2017

Daly Waters and the Daly Waters Pub

Daly Waters is a small town set around 620 kilometres from Darwin in the heart of Australia’s Northern Territory. Traditionally owned by the Jingili people, it is thought that the Dreaming tracks of the Emu and Sun made their way through the spot where the town now is as they ventured to the south of the region. The Daly Waters Pub Perhaps the most iconic attraction in town is the Daly Waters Pub, an historic watering hole with tonnes of character. Dating back to 1930, it has a turbulent history peppered with shoot outs, witnessed murders, and cattle stampedes – […]

1
June
2017

The Dreamtime Stories of the Devil’s Marbles

Forming one of the Northern Territory’s most impressive geological wonders, the Devil’s Marbles can be found not too far from Uluru. These impressive granite boulders are peppered around a sprawling valley about 100 kilometres to the south of Tennant Creek. The “Marbles” have been formed over millions of years by the act of erosion and rise up out of the desert scenery in a surreal display of granite – kind of like a natural art exhibition. Each boulder comes in a different size, ranging from between 50 centimetres to six metres across. Perhaps the most amazing part of the scene […]

28
April
2017

Relaxing at the Mataranka Hot Springs

Near Uluru, 100km south of Katherine, Mataranka brings visitors a lush landscape that’s peppered with thermal pools, trickling streams, and plenty of places to feed the local Barramundi. Here, you can kick back and relax in one of the many watering holes, or explore the shady trails that weave through ancient palm trees and other fascinating vegetation – keep your eyes peeled for the local wildlife, too. Perhaps the biggest draw to the region are the Mataranka Hot Springs. Said to heal any aches and pains, the sparkling, clear waters perch in the shade of the many paperbark and palm […]

12
April
2017

Uluru vs Ayers Rock: The Name Change of Australia’s Most Iconic Monument

Standing at 348 metres above the desert floor, Uluru is the world’s largest monolith and one of Australia’s most iconic landmarks. But it hasn’t always been called Uluru. In fact, for most people, the towering red rock formation is simply known as Ayers Rock and has been for years, but its rich and fascinating Aboriginal history encouraged a name-change back in the 90s. In 1872, European explorer Ernest Giles first dubbed the rock Ayers Rock after the South Australian Premier at the time, Sir Henry Ayers. However, the rock’s history dates back thousands and thousands of years and has been […]

24
March
2017

Mt Conner – Red Centre’s hidden gem

When people think of Northern Territory’s Red Centre, one mountain generally springs to mind. Uluru is the world’s largest rock and is the beacon for tourist attractions across the entire country. If you know a little more about the Red Centre, though, you may even know about Kata Tjuta, another phenomenal mountain that is actually linked to the same underground rock formation as Uluru. With this having been said, there is a third mountain that is often entirely ignored or forgotten. Known as Mt Conner, this flat-topped monolith is estimated to be 500 million years old. Though it may be […]

16
March
2017

Exploring the Garden of Eden in Kings Canyon

Kings Canyon sits in the heart of Australia’s famed Red Centre close to the iconic landmark of Uluru. Here, vast sandstone landscapes mingle with ancient rock formations and gorges to create a surreal scene like nowhere else in the country. As part of the Watarrka National Park, Kings Canyon is an important conservation area and home to more than 600 native species of plant and animals – many of which are completely unique to the area between Alice Springs and Uluru. The Kings Canyon is renowned for its jutting sandstone walls, which have been created over millions of years. The […]

15
February
2017

The Significance of Uluru to Australian Indigenous Culture

Uluru might be one of Australia’s most iconic landmarks, but it’s also a hugely important part of the country’s cultural history. The landscape surrounding the monolith has been inhabited for thousands and thousands of years – long before it was “officially” discovered in the 1800s. Today, Uluru and the Aboriginal culture that imbues the area are very much entwined in a historic narrative that spans generations. The natural landmark is thought to have been formed by ancestral beings during the fabled Dreamtime. According to the local Aboriginal people, Uluru’s numerous caves and fissures prove this. Even today, rituals are still […]

1
February
2017

Why You Should Walk the Valley of the Winds

The Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is one of the most popular attractions in Australia, drawing in visitors who are keen to explore the natural and cultural history of the region. Set in the Red Centre of the country and encompassing one of Australia’s most iconic landmarks, Uluru, it boasts numerous unusual geological features. Though Uluru is the main attraction in the area, it’s well worth exploring Kata Tjuta (also known as the Olgas), which is a land of 36 steep sandstone monoliths that are dotted across the rugged and wild landscape. To view these exceptional natural offerings, you can head […]

10
January
2017

Learning About Uluru and Its Past at the Cultural Centre

In the heart of Australia’s Red Centre, you’ll find a rich and fascinating history that surrounds Uluru, one of the country’s most prolific monuments. Shrouded in red dust and boasting an impressive silhouette, this natural wonder has formed an important part of Aboriginal life for thousands of years. When you’re in the region, there are plenty of ways you can learn more about the expansive culture of the region – one such way is visiting the on-site Cultural Centre. Here, you can get an overview of the natural and cultural history of Uluru and its surrounding scenery from knowledgeable staff, […]

22
December
2016

Camels and Canyons at Kings Creek Station

In the heart of Australia’s Red Centre, the scenery looks like it’s from another planet. Uluru casts an impressive silhouette against the skyline, while other incredible natural monuments show the centuries-old history that this part of the country holds. At Kings Creek Station, you can experience the Red Centre and all it has to offer. Opened back in 1981, the Station is a working cattle and camel ranch with a range of facilities for visitors, including camping, accommodation, and a selection of fun outdoor activities. It sits just 36km from Kings Canyon, one of the most popular attractions in the […]

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