Is Yulara & Uluru the same?

Uluru, Australia’s magnificent, monolithic red centre, is one of the world’s most instantly recognisable natural wonders. This stunning sandstone mass rising from the earth below is on any Aussie traveller’s to-do list, not to mention those of people coming from all around the world!

Kata Tjuta

Uluru is certainly not to be confused with Yulara – the township formed to support tourism and eco-protection at Uluru. Yulara is a town located just a short distance from the entry gate to the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, and is home to the resorts that many Uluru-Kata Tjuta visitors opt to stay at.

So, now that we’ve cleared up any potential confusion surrounding Uluru and Yulara, let’s get stuck into the wonders that await you in the wondrous red centre!

Uluru, obviously!

There is nothing in the world quite like Uluru, a mammoth sandstone formation that forms the traditional symbol of this wide and magical land. The best way to see Uluru, and the way that should never be passed up, is by seeing it in the twilight hours.

Yes, by seeing Uluru in at dawn or dusk, you will get to experience this majestic rock in all the golden hues that nature intended for it: shining golds, moody blues, vibrant pinks and striking reds!

Do yourself an absolute favour and get out there at one of these times, as well as exploring its unique formation in the day, of course!

Kata Tjuta

People often dream of venturing to Uluru without even knowing about its equally-impressive neighbour in Kata Tjuta! Kata Tjuta, as opposed to being one giant monolith, is a series of dome-esque sandstone structures boggling out of the landscape below.

What makes Kata Tjuta such a wonderful place to visit is the way you can traverse its stunning valleys via a series of hikes. These hikes allow you the perfect opportunity to experience the stunning sandstone formations from within the structures after you’ve seen it from outside – it’s something you aren’t likely to forget any time soon…

Mutitjulu Waterhole

Uluru, and even Kata Tjuta to a lesser extent, can get pretty packed with people. After all, Uluru is the world famous red centre, the symbolic natural icon of this nation and a truly spectacular site to behold.

But this doesn’t mean you might not want to escape all that buzz for a moment’s peace and reflection – be sure to do it at the Mutitjulu Waterhole, a truly serene spot located not far from the rock itself…

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