Mutitjulu Waterhole: The History and Highlights of a Natural Wonder

Did you know that Uluru has a number of watering holes? Most people imagine Uluru as a large, jutting orange rock that adds a surreal silhouette to Australia’s outback, but they rarely know more than this.

Yes, Uluru is ‘just a rock’ but it also boasts a selection of wonderful natural highlights. In the surrounding areas, there are valleys, peaks, and trails that weave through the dusty landscape and offer a burst of greenery against the arid backdrop.

What is Mutitjulu Waterhole?

Mutitjulu is one of these natural wonders that Uluru harbours – one that very few people actually know about. Situated on the eastern side of Uluru, Mutitjulu waterhole is an unusually shaped water-filled hole at the base of the rock.

But Mutitjulu is so much more than just a hole filled with water. As well as providing a thirst-quenching hotspot for animals and humans for many, many years, it’s also a tight Indigenous Australian community that is home to almost 300 Aboriginal peoples.

The people that live there have a major stake in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park which is home to Uluru and all its natural adornments – including Mutitjulu waterhole. TheMutitjulu Waterhole rock art vast majority of these people are Pitjantjatjara, but there are also a fair few Yankunytjatjara, Luritia, and Ngaanvatiarra people who speak a collection of languages, including Pitjantjatjara, Luritja, and Yangkunytjatjara.

Things to do at Mutitjulu Waterhole

Surrounded by beautiful scenery and shaded by the impressive height of Uluru, Mutitjulu waterhole boasts a number of things to do in and around its perimeter. Besides viewing Uluru and learning about the rock’s history at the Cultural Centre, you can also spend some time getting to know the watering hole and its history.

View Rock Art

At the Mutitjulu waterhole you can spot some Aboriginal Rock Art which has been created and preserved by the Aboriginal peoples over millions of years. The rock etchings tell a story through their intricate pictures, revealing the lifestyle of indigenous peoples many years ago and offering an insight into this popular and sacred area of Australia.

Walking Trails

This part of Australia is perfect for outdoor lovers and keen hikers, simply because there is so much to explore. As well as exploring the base of Uluru, there are a number of outback trails weaving through the surrounding scenery, taking in Mutitjulu watering hole and other natural wonders, including the vibrant red walls of King’s Canyon and a number of other, lesser-known water holes.

See the Mutitjulu Waterhole on our Uluru Tour.

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