How far is Kings Canyon from Uluru?

Kings Canyon, although not as instantly recognisable as its “not-too-distant” neighbours Uluru and Kata Tjuta, is one of the marvellous spectacles that make the Northern Territory one of Australia’s great wilderness states.

Kings Canyon, Uluru

Kings Canyon epitomises everything that’s so rugged, so raw and untouched about the NT, with its golden peaks towering above the sprawling canyon below creating a dazzling lights show that only this part of the country can really offer!

Kings Canyon is about 300km from Uluru, which is more congested terms might sound like an epic, multi-drive – but it ain’t in this part of the country! Yes, the drive from Uluru out to Kings Canyon only takes about four hours, making it one of the perfect places to dust off your hiking boots when visiting the great Red Centre.

So, now that we’ve got drivetime out of the way, what are some of the marvellous adventures that await you at both Kings Canyon and Uluru?

Hiking Kings Canyon

Kings Canyon, alongside the likes of Kakadu and Litchfield, is one of the NT’s hiking paradises. This incredible land is situated within the epic Watarrka National Park, home to the Luritja Aboriginal people for over 20,000 years! Whilst hiking in your own group is a top way to see the park and its majestic sun displays, a guided tour with one of the Luritja locals is the ultimate way to learn about their special connection to the land and how they have thrived there for so long.

Kings Canyon is also home to an incredible 600 species of flora and fauna, with all kinds of fascinating animal and plant species calling this gorgeous oasis home.

See Uluru in the twilight hours

Uluru is Australia’s greatest natural icon, a gigantic monolith jutting out of the red earth and shining bright under the Red Centre sun. A journey to Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is like no other, and there is no better way to see the magnificent rock than in the twilight hours.

See it in the morning hours, when it goes from being a massive blue figure to the shining red rock of daylight; or in the sunset hour, when it returns to its blueish figure under the sun’s beautiful last hour.

Be sure to top off your visit to Uluru by heading over to Kata Tjuta: an equally impressive series of dome formations that provide life to hundreds of plant and animal species within its surreal red walls.

Related article: Following the trails of Watarrka National Park

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